As 2019 wanes, US Library of Congress leaves insult to Native American in place

bricks symbol for brickbatsIn June, 2019, I wrote a column to call attention to misleading information the US Library of Congress published. The LOC, enthusiastically announcing the appointment of Joy Harjo as the nation’s new poet laureate, claimed in the subhead to the article that Harjo is the first Native American to serve as US poet laureate. Poet A.M. Juster attempted to get the record set straight, as did I.

Harjo was not the nation’s first native American to serve in that capacity, unless you play word games with reality or opt for politics over truth. Continue reading “As 2019 wanes, US Library of Congress leaves insult to Native American in place”

US gets a new Poet Laureate, but headlines mislead on ‘Native American’ aspect

Yesterday I think there were (at first) two people in the country who questioned a headline featured at many different media outlets. I was one of those two. The other person is a poet I’ve admired for quite some time. The headlines stated the new US Poet Laureate, Joy Harjo, is the nation’s first Native American to serve as US Poet Laureate. That statement is misleading and a fact check is in order. Continue reading “US gets a new Poet Laureate, but headlines mislead on ‘Native American’ aspect”

For Jennifer Reeser, Web conferred blessings on perspective and more

Part 3 of 3

Jennifer Reeser
Poet Jennifer Reeser (used with permission)

What was the world of poetry like before most Americans gained access to the Internet? For one thing, fewer poets were published. In order to get into a print magazine, your work was vetted by an editor.

Universities controlled most public readings. In one sense, you had to be known to the ‘knowns’ in order to climb the ladder of publication and rewards. Although much has changed since that time, much remains the same.  Continue reading “For Jennifer Reeser, Web conferred blessings on perspective and more”