Reeser’s ‘Strong Feather’ sonnet like a kick in the gut

Poet Jennifer Reeser has a new sonnet at Rattle, a print and online magazine known for publishing poets laureate and emerging voices. The sonnet, “Strong Feather Buries the White Woman’ is powerful, not just in terms of the history of our young country, the US, but in terms of my personal history. By coincidence as I read her sonnet for the first time, I was also engrossed in Reeser’s latest collection, Indigenous. In between reading those poems, I’ve been immersed in reading the A Song of Ice and Fire novels the HBO series Game of Thrones was based upon. Her

Reeser poetry and GOT novels on my summer list–how about yours?

I’m not sure why I do this, because I read during the year too, but as summer approaches, I come up with a reading list. Maybe it’s a holdover from my school days. This year my list is ambitious. I’ve purchased Jennifer Reeser’s much-praised poetry collection Indigenous. I just purchased the 5-book bundle of George R. R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire novels. I deliberately didn’t read the novels until the Game of Thrones series on TV began to come to a close, so I’ll read them now and do some commentary on the books in comparison to

For Jennifer Reeser, Web conferred blessings on perspective and more

Part 3 of 3 What was the world of poetry like before most Americans gained access to the Internet? For one thing, fewer poets were published. In order to get into a print magazine, your work was vetted by an editor. Universities controlled most public readings. In one sense, you had to be known to the ‘knowns’ in order to climb the ladder of publication and rewards. Although much has changed since that time, much remains the same. 

The making of the incredibly versatile Jennifer Reeser

Pt. 2 of 3 Jennifer Reeser, in case you missed the first article in our series about her, is no ordinary writer. Exceptional poet, widely praised translator, essayist, and reviewer, Reeser has long refused to confine her intellect to one form or genre. Years ago, a famous poet’s son who became an accomplished writer told how his father “made his head.” As with everything, seeds of one’s future are sown at a very young age.

Ghost tours and voodoo—nothing off limits for Reeser’s poetry

Pt. 1 of 3 Let’s face it. Poetry can be boring. On the other hand, poetry can be exhilarating when the writer dares to tread on murky ground. Jennifer Reeser does the latter. Her work has appeared in numerous anthologies and in her own collections, and you never know what subject she will tackle next. A master sonneteer and expert at other forms as well, her poems fall flawlessly on the ear. Among those I found extremely interesting is Reeser’s collection The Lalaurie Horror, described as a “poetic ghost tour” of a mansion once owned by an alleged female serial

National Poetry Day launches in UK, but Americans get in on the fun

At first I thought it was a mistake because I’ve covered National Poetry Month stories for a long time. In the US, April is the month we celebrate poetry. As I read through posts on the Twitter cesspool, I realized the Brits celebrate the genre differently. Turns out today, October 4, is National Poetry Day in the United Kingdom. It also turns out I found some nice poems nestled in a lot of lame verses. 

World Book Day brings out bibliophiles

The phrase World Book Day is trending on social media, and bibliophiles are not hesitating to advise people to go read a book. In an age where so many read only on digital devices, it’s nice to see those old fashioned reading devices get a nod. Ironically the date for the celebration in 2018 is also the birthday and death date for one of the world’s most influential writers. 

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