As 2019 wanes, US Library of Congress leaves insult to Native American in place

bricks symbol for brickbatsIn June, 2019, I wrote a column to call attention to misleading information the US Library of Congress published. The LOC, enthusiastically announcing the appointment of Joy Harjo as the nation’s new poet laureate, claimed in the subhead to the article that Harjo is the first Native American to serve as US poet laureate. Poet A.M. Juster attempted to get the record set straight, as did I.

Harjo was not the nation’s first native American to serve in that capacity, unless you play word games with reality or opt for politics over truth. Continue reading “As 2019 wanes, US Library of Congress leaves insult to Native American in place”

‘Indigenous’ author Reeser tapped for ‘Louisiana Poet Laureate Presents’ event

Poet and author Jennifer Reeser has been tapped by the Louisiana Book Festival to present her new book ‘Indigenous’ during ‘The Louisiana Poet Laureate Presents’ event. Reeser will be there on November 2 for the event in the state capitol complex in Baton Rouge. Approximately 24,000 people are expected to attend. Continue reading “‘Indigenous’ author Reeser tapped for ‘Louisiana Poet Laureate Presents’ event”

Reeser’s ‘Strong Feather’ sonnet like a kick in the gut

Jennifer Reeser
Poet Jennifer Reeser (used with permission)

Poet Jennifer Reeser has a new sonnet at Rattle, a print and online magazine known for publishing poets laureate and emerging voices. The sonnet, “Strong Feather Buries the White Woman’ is powerful, not just in terms of the history of our young country, the US, but in terms of my personal history.

By coincidence as I read her sonnet for the first time, I was also engrossed in Reeser’s latest collection, Indigenous. In between reading those poems, I’ve been immersed in reading the A Song of Ice and Fire novels the HBO series Game of Thrones was based upon. Her work is a perfect fit for those novels. Why? Continue reading “Reeser’s ‘Strong Feather’ sonnet like a kick in the gut”

Reeser poetry and GOT novels on my summer list–how about yours?

I’m not sure why I do this, because I read during the year too, but as summer approaches, I come up with a reading list. Maybe it’s a holdover from my school days. This year my list is ambitious.

I’ve purchased Jennifer Reeser’s much-praised poetry collection Indigenous. I just purchased the 5-book bundle of George R. R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire novels. I deliberately didn’t read the novels until the Game of Thrones series on TV began to come to a close, so I’ll read them now and do some commentary on the books in comparison to the series.

I was pleasantly surprised about something related to those novels. Continue reading “Reeser poetry and GOT novels on my summer list–how about yours?”

For Jennifer Reeser, Web conferred blessings on perspective and more

Part 3 of 3

Jennifer Reeser
Poet Jennifer Reeser (used with permission)

What was the world of poetry like before most Americans gained access to the Internet? For one thing, fewer poets were published. In order to get into a print magazine, your work was vetted by an editor.

Universities controlled most public readings. In one sense, you had to be known to the ‘knowns’ in order to climb the ladder of publication and rewards. Although much has changed since that time, much remains the same.  Continue reading “For Jennifer Reeser, Web conferred blessings on perspective and more”