D-Day art and letters—“Into the Jaws of Death”, hero weathermen, poets

Robert F. Sargent, who served in the US Coast Guard, took this photograph of Allied troops on D-Day. He captioned it, "Into the Jaws of Death."
Robert F. Sargent, who served in the US Coast Guard, took this photograph of Allied troops on D-Day. He captioned it, “Into the Jaws of Death.”

If you’re a baby boomer, you know what D-Day was and what it stands for. If you’re younger, probably not so much. The tragic dearth of history, both global and domestic, in US classrooms has led to broad ignorance on more topics than I can count. On D-Day, June 6, 1944, more than 150,000 men were carried across the English Channel to begin wresting France from the hands of the National Socialist German Workers Party, more popularly known as the “Nazis.” Mother Nature had actually delayed the crossing by a day. Thousands of Allied troops died; thousands of Nazis died. Thousands of French civilians died. Some of the lesser known heroes that day were weathermen. Continue reading “D-Day art and letters—“Into the Jaws of Death”, hero weathermen, poets”