For Jennifer Reeser, Web conferred blessings on perspective and more

Part 3 of 3

Jennifer Reeser
Poet Jennifer Reeser (used with permission)

What was the world of poetry like before most Americans gained access to the Internet? For one thing, fewer poets were published. In order to get into a print magazine, your work was vetted by an editor.

Universities controlled most public readings. In one sense, you had to be known to the ‘knowns’ in order to climb the ladder of publication and rewards. Although much has changed since that time, much remains the same.  Continue reading “For Jennifer Reeser, Web conferred blessings on perspective and more”

The making of the incredibly versatile Jennifer Reeser

Pt. 2 of 3

Jennifer Reeser
Poet Jennifer Reeser (used with permission)

Jennifer Reeser, in case you missed the first article in our series about her, is no ordinary writer. Exceptional poet, widely praised translator, essayist, and reviewer, Reeser has long refused to confine her intellect to one form or genre.

Years ago, a famous poet’s son who became an accomplished writer told how his father “made his head.” As with everything, seeds of one’s future are sown at a very young age. Continue reading “The making of the incredibly versatile Jennifer Reeser”

Ghost tours and voodoo—nothing off limits for Reeser’s poetry

Pt. 1 of 3

Jennifer Reeser
Poet Jennifer Reeser (used with permission)

Let’s face it. Poetry can be boring. On the other hand, poetry can be exhilarating when the writer dares to tread on murky ground.

Jennifer Reeser does the latter. Her work has appeared in numerous anthologies and in her own collections, and you never know what subject she will tackle next. A master sonneteer and expert at other forms as well, her poems fall flawlessly on the ear. Among those I found extremely interesting is Reeser’s collection The Lalaurie Horror, described as a “poetic ghost tour” of a mansion once owned by an alleged female serial killer. Continue reading “Ghost tours and voodoo—nothing off limits for Reeser’s poetry”