For me, Jackson’s song stands out among top branded works on 9/11/2001

New York City; Spring, 2001. Photo by Jen Day-Thompson
New York City; Spring, 2001. Photo by Jen Day-Thompson

It’s not surprising that the attacks on the US on September 11, 2001 inspired art in different genres. One of the most significant genres is the music that tragic day produced. For my generation, and those younger, 9/11 was perceived in a manner similar to the way my grandparents and parents responded to Pearl Harbor Day observed on December 7. Some songs touch us more than others. Continue reading “For me, Jackson’s song stands out among top branded works on 9/11/2001”

Confessions and concerns about privacy nix sharing icons at IAS

This wood engraving dated May 3, 1917, by Winsor McCay, was published by the New York American Editorial Page. The theme addressed concerns about the Espionage Act passed in June, 2017. The engraving is part of the US Library of Congress Digital Collection.
This wood engraving dated May 3, 1917, by Winsor McCay, was published by the New York American Editorial Page. The theme addressed concerns about the Espionage Act passed in June, 2017. The engraving is part of the US Library of Congress Digital Collection.

I’ve long had concerns about privacy, sharing methods, and search histories on the Internet. While there have long been activists concerned about government spying, there are less concerns about Big Tech spying although in my opinion it’s widespread. Have you ever looked at the long URL that shows up in your browser if you follow a search result from a list returned by the biggest search engine on the Web?

Have you ever thought about data harvested when you ‘share’ an article via social media? If you haven’t thought about it, maybe you should. Continue reading “Confessions and concerns about privacy nix sharing icons at IAS”

Coins with mint errors can be worth thousands—what’s in your quarters?

US coins Indie Art South picDo you ever really look at the change in your pocket? I don’t. I use it either to donate to various charity boxes at retailers or to offset getting more coins when I pay cash for something. I didn’t know that coins with mint errors could be in my purse, and I didn’t know they’re valuable. I came across an article about mint coin errors this morning, and I realized old coins are in many ways a work of art that can increase in value. Continue reading “Coins with mint errors can be worth thousands—what’s in your quarters?”

Oliver Cooper pulls off Son of Sam serial killer with exceptional performance

Oliver Cooper as David Berkowitz aka Son of Sam in Netflix's Mindhunter series.
Oliver Cooper depicted David Berkowitz, the serial killer known as Son of Sam, in the Netflix series ‘Mindhunter’.

I’m famous in personal circles for rarely watching TV, but the Netflix series Mindhunter managed to capture my attention. Maybe it was because I was a young adult when horrendous crimes like those of Charles Manson’s ‘family’ occurred. Other reasons include some fine performances by the actors, and I have to say Oliver Cooper, who played the role of David Berkowitz known as ‘Son of Sam’, gave an exceptional performance. Berkowitz was the guy I found creepiest of all during the time he was at large, grabbing headlines on a daily basis. Continue reading “Oliver Cooper pulls off Son of Sam serial killer with exceptional performance”

City of Atlanta and Jimmy Buffett’s resort set to destroy historic country music site

The single 'The Little Old Log Cabin in the Lane' recorded in 1923 can be heard on YouTube. (Image by BBYMRLCCOTN)
The single ‘The Little Old Log Cabin in the Lane’ recorded in 1923 can be heard on YouTube. (Image by BBYMRLCCOTN)

Country music wasn’t always mainstream as it is today. In 1923 the genre stood on the breakout brink, and a major influence in that breakout was a song titled “The Little Old Log Cabin in the Lane.” The building where that song was recorded is about to be destroyed with the city of Atlanta’s blessing, although there is an effort to save it. Pop icon Jimmy Buffett also has a profit-seeking hand in the destruction. Continue reading “City of Atlanta and Jimmy Buffett’s resort set to destroy historic country music site”

West Ashley Street Blues—in Jacksonville, Florida?

Blind Blake and Jacksonville, a historic stop along the blues music trail

Image of Blind Blake from popular YouTube site RagtimeDorian Henry: youtu.be/D-YwCk6ANY4
Image of Blind Blake from popular YouTube site RagtimeDorian Henry: youtu.be/D-YwCk6ANY4

In discussions about the stomping grounds of early blues musicians, Mississippi, Chicago, and Memphis are cited as havens for the birth of the first blues wave.

Delta blues arising by the waters of the Mississippi river. The swinging, big band style of Chicago. The intricate, bouncing notes of the Piedmont blues. Blues in other areas aren’t discussed as much, although the genre touched many different communities in the United States. Continue reading “West Ashley Street Blues—in Jacksonville, Florida?”

FBI comes clean about Big Foot after 42 years

Big Foot, also known as Sasquatch, has been the subject of an FBI “investigation”—sort of. So many claims have been made about this ape-like creature who allegedly roams not only the dreams of imaginative children but also the wilderness in the northwestern area of the United States. Big Foot never quite caught my imagination, but he certainly has drawn attention from bloggers, indie documentary makers, and dedicated sleuths like Peter C. Byrne. It was a letter from Mr. Byrne that sparked a closer look at Bigfoot from the FBI, and the federal law enforcement agency delivered hard results the government is now sharing with all of us. There were “15 hairs attached to a tiny piece of skin.” Continue reading “FBI comes clean about Big Foot after 42 years”

D-Day art and letters—“Into the Jaws of Death”, hero weathermen, poets

Robert F. Sargent, who served in the US Coast Guard, took this photograph of Allied troops on D-Day. He captioned it, "Into the Jaws of Death."
Robert F. Sargent, who served in the US Coast Guard, took this photograph of Allied troops on D-Day. He captioned it, “Into the Jaws of Death.”

If you’re a baby boomer, you know what D-Day was and what it stands for. If you’re younger, probably not so much. The tragic dearth of history, both global and domestic, in US classrooms has led to broad ignorance on more topics than I can count. On D-Day, June 6, 1944, more than 150,000 men were carried across the English Channel to begin wresting France from the hands of the National Socialist German Workers Party, more popularly known as the “Nazis.” Mother Nature had actually delayed the crossing by a day. Thousands of Allied troops died; thousands of Nazis died. Thousands of French civilians died. Some of the lesser known heroes that day were weathermen. Continue reading “D-Day art and letters—“Into the Jaws of Death”, hero weathermen, poets”

Attorney determined to clear pilot’s name—again—in Skyway Bridge disaster

Iconic moment showing a car driven by Richard Hornbuckle who was able to brake just in time to avoid a plunge into the Bay after a freighter hit the Skyway Bridge in 1980. Hornbuckle told media, "“The Lord was real good to the four of us." (Image from NBC news video May 9, 1980 provided to Facebook)
Richard Hornbuckle said, “The Lord was real good to the four of us,” after he was able to brake in time when part of the Skyway Bridge collapsed, falling into Tampa Bay on May 9, 1980. (Photo from NBC News broadcast; May 9, 1980; video on Facebook)

Each May Floridians remember the 35 victims of the Skyway Bridge disaster in Tampa Bay. A freighter struck the bridge early in the morning on May 9, 1980. The freighter, Summit Venture, was flying the Liberian flag when a sudden storm made it impossible for radar to work.

The freighter was trying to turn when it struck the bridge. John E. Lerro, the pilot, eventually was cleared as far as fault goes, but that didn’t stop people from judging him. Media understandably covered the story intensely. Lerro is dead now, but his attorney aims to clear his name for the second time.

Tampa attorney Steve Yerrid is co-producing a film about the bridge disaster, hoping to set the record straight. Some media accounts reportedly blamed Lerro, and public opinion embraced theories the pilot had been drinking. Yerrid dismissed those theories because, he said, Lerro “was a health nut.” Continue reading “Attorney determined to clear pilot’s name—again—in Skyway Bridge disaster”

A lesson for indie artists in new film on Bonnie and Clyde

When my husband asked if I wanted to watch the new film about the legendary Bonnie and Clyde, I said yes, but without much enthusiasm. By the end of the film we watched on Netflix, I was singing a different tune. The Highwaymen is well worth viewing. There’s another takeaway too, though, and there’s a lesson for indie artists. Continue reading “A lesson for indie artists in new film on Bonnie and Clyde”