In Brit series on Thorpe scandal, you may not recognize Hugh Grant

Hugh Grant photo by Kurt Kulac [CC BY-SA]
Hugh Grant photo by Kurt Kulac [CC BY-SA]
My husband and I try to find programs we can enjoy together, and we often fail unless it’s college football. I usually end up reading or writing after we eat and spend time together each evening. Last week I was scrolling around on Amazon Prime and saw a series that looked interesting—A Very English Scandal.

I didn’t pay attention to who was in the BBC production. I remembered the sizzling reportage about the Jeremy Thorpe scandal from the 1970s when I was young and blessedly oblivious to most politics.

We began to stream the show, and after a few seconds, I said, “Wow! That’s Hugh Grant.” Continue reading “In Brit series on Thorpe scandal, you may not recognize Hugh Grant”

Quibi “star power” debut in April evokes serialized novels of past

cell phone generic image Indie Art South
General photo of cell phone: has nothing to do with the Quibi app. (Photo: Indie Art South)

Lots of buzz right now about a new streaming service, Quibi, debuting in April, and the first thing I thought of was the way novels used to be serialized in newspapers and magazines.

The new app is rumored to rely on “star power,” because the assumption is that if you’re a celebrity-oriented reader, you’ll be happy to pay for the “quick bites” the app delivers to your device. Continue reading “Quibi “star power” debut in April evokes serialized novels of past”

Project Blue Book series mixes truth and fiction; UFO mysteries remain

A United States Coast Guard photographer, Shell R. Alpert, took a photograph that allegedly shows unidentified flying objects flying in a “V” formation at the Salem, Massachusetts, air station at 9:35 a.m. on 16 July 1952, through a window screen. (Official U.S. Coast Guard photograph: 5554. Library of Congress Control Number: 2007680837
A United States Coast Guard photographer, Shell R. Alpert, took a photograph that allegedly shows unidentified flying objects flying in a “V” formation at the Salem, Massachusetts, air station at 9:35 a.m. on 16 July 1952, through a window screen. (Official U.S. Coast Guard photograph: 5554. Library of Congress Control Number: 2007680837

If you’re interested in unidentified flying objects, the History channel series Project Blue Book will definitely entertain you. The series is based on actual events, but admittedly, quite a bit of fiction is thrown in with the evidence. If you’re a skeptic, you may deride the series. If you’re a proponent of the theory alien creatures could try to visit Planet Earth, you may deride the government. As with all theories investigated by the government, the truth lies somewhere between.

We can come to at least two definite conclusions about Project Blue Book, an investigative program begun by the US government in 1952. Continue reading “Project Blue Book series mixes truth and fiction; UFO mysteries remain”

Would your favorite indie musician qualify for SoundCloud’s new ‘Promote’ tool?

image of cash currency, Indie Art SouthSound Cloud, a streaming service based in Europe, has a new tool for musicians, and it’s likely an aim for more market share. There’s a hitch or two, though, for indie musicians because you have to meet certain requirements to be able to use the new ‘Promote’ tool. Would your favorite indie musician qualify?

Continue reading “Would your favorite indie musician qualify for SoundCloud’s new ‘Promote’ tool?”

Jack Ryan, Season 2, satisfies and mystifies as some critics miss the Venezuela boat

Photo of Mt. Roraima in Venezuela from CIA World Fact Book.
Photo of Mt. Roraima, the world’s highest tabletop mountain, in Venezuela from CIA World Fact Book.
Promo poster from Amazon Prime
Promo poster of Jack Ryan from Amazon Prime

Tom Clancy’s ‘Jack Ryan’ is back on Amazon Prime for Season 2, and it’s not surprising to see some critics completely miss the boat. Venezuela is the location for this season, and the story is vintage screen version Clancy.

Secret mining ops for a valuable mineral. Corruption within a brutal government regime. Sophisticated technology that has to do with the South China Sea—this last aspect is a bit confusing, I admit. Overall, though, this is one series you want to watch from start to finish. Continue reading “Jack Ryan, Season 2, satisfies and mystifies as some critics miss the Venezuela boat”