The Legend of the Last Panther of the Ozarks

New attention for Frank Sanford after rare video published

Still shot of Frank Stanford from the recently released short documentary 'It Wasn't a Dream, It Was a Flood'.
Still shot of Frank Stanford from the recently released short documentary ‘It Wasn’t a Dream, It Was a Flood’.

How I discovered Frank Stanford could be interpreted in different ways.

To the devoutly logical, it was purely by accident. During a search for southern gothic writers, my cursor just happened to click on his thumbnail image in some random act even though I was dragging it in the opposite direction. Continue reading “The Legend of the Last Panther of the Ozarks”

‘Indigenous’ author Reeser tapped for ‘Louisiana Poet Laureate Presents’ event

Poet and author Jennifer Reeser has been tapped by the Louisiana Book Festival to present her new book ‘Indigenous’ during ‘The Louisiana Poet Laureate Presents’ event. Reeser will be there on November 2 for the event in the state capitol complex in Baton Rouge. Approximately 24,000 people are expected to attend. Continue reading “‘Indigenous’ author Reeser tapped for ‘Louisiana Poet Laureate Presents’ event”

US gets a new Poet Laureate, but headlines mislead on ‘Native American’ aspect

Yesterday I think there were (at first) two people in the country who questioned a headline featured at many different media outlets. I was one of those two. The other person is a poet I’ve admired for quite some time. The headlines stated the new US Poet Laureate, Joy Harjo, is the nation’s first Native American to serve as US Poet Laureate. That statement is misleading and a fact check is in order. Continue reading “US gets a new Poet Laureate, but headlines mislead on ‘Native American’ aspect”

D-Day art and letters—“Into the Jaws of Death”, hero weathermen, poets

Robert F. Sargent, who served in the US Coast Guard, took this photograph of Allied troops on D-Day. He captioned it, "Into the Jaws of Death."
Robert F. Sargent, who served in the US Coast Guard, took this photograph of Allied troops on D-Day. He captioned it, “Into the Jaws of Death.”

If you’re a baby boomer, you know what D-Day was and what it stands for. If you’re younger, probably not so much. The tragic dearth of history, both global and domestic, in US classrooms has led to broad ignorance on more topics than I can count. On D-Day, June 6, 1944, more than 150,000 men were carried across the English Channel to begin wresting France from the hands of the National Socialist German Workers Party, more popularly known as the “Nazis.” Mother Nature had actually delayed the crossing by a day. Thousands of Allied troops died; thousands of Nazis died. Thousands of French civilians died. Some of the lesser known heroes that day were weathermen. Continue reading “D-Day art and letters—“Into the Jaws of Death”, hero weathermen, poets”

Reeser’s ‘Strong Feather’ sonnet like a kick in the gut

Jennifer Reeser
Poet Jennifer Reeser (used with permission)

Poet Jennifer Reeser has a new sonnet at Rattle, a print and online magazine known for publishing poets laureate and emerging voices. The sonnet, “Strong Feather Buries the White Woman’ is powerful, not just in terms of the history of our young country, the US, but in terms of my personal history.

By coincidence as I read her sonnet for the first time, I was also engrossed in Reeser’s latest collection, Indigenous. In between reading those poems, I’ve been immersed in reading the A Song of Ice and Fire novels the HBO series Game of Thrones was based upon. Her work is a perfect fit for those novels. Why? Continue reading “Reeser’s ‘Strong Feather’ sonnet like a kick in the gut”