Apology to my readers; Still blogging, against all odds

I’ve blogged, both as an indie site owner and for freelance accounts, many times over the years. In the early days, there were bugs in software and there were challenges. Still, you could draw traffic with good posts and I stayed in the game. Then approximately six or seven years ago things changed, and not for the better.  Continue reading “Apology to my readers; Still blogging, against all odds”

After the Fourth, pup has a fireworks ‘hangover’

Bear on July 5
The day after the Fourth, when Bear heard thunder, he appeared to think it was more fireworks. (Photo: Indie Art South)

This Fourth of July, for unknown reasons, the fireworks in our area were louder, went longer, and flashed brighter than usual. Our Yorkie mix normally isn’t bothered by loud sounds unless they are unusually loud. So when Bear started pacing around last night, I didn’t think too much of it. By bedtime, though, I’d changed my mind. By the next day, because of Mother Nature, I realized Bear had what might be called a fireworks hangover.  Continue reading “After the Fourth, pup has a fireworks ‘hangover’”

Imagination nation: World UFO Day is July 2

Four UFOs sighted above the Salem, Massachusetts Coast Guard Air Station on July 16, 1952. Photo by Seaman Shell R. Alpert. Also present was Hospitalman Thomas E. Flaherty. (US Naval Institute pic and caption)
Four UFOs sighted above the Salem, Massachusetts Coast Guard Air Station on July 16, 1952. Photo by Seaman Shell R. Alpert. Also present was Hospitalman Thomas E. Flaherty. (US Naval Institute pic and caption)

July 2 is World UFO Day, and it’s a given that many Americans are interested in mysteries the heavens hold. Mysteries in the sky have intrigued mankind dating to antiquity. Power brokers have expressed interest in unidentified flying objects, and a famous author whose works date to the 1950s is now considered a visionary. Even the US Naval Institute has documented photos of objects that haven’t been identified. The USA is an imagination nation for sure, but governments traditionally weren’t exactly forthcoming about such mysteries.  Continue reading “Imagination nation: World UFO Day is July 2”

One critical protection for musicians and attendees at outdoor concerts

It was a classic yin and yang moment. We were standing in a park along with hundreds of others here in Florida. We’d come to hear music, grab a bite from one of the food trucks, and socialize. My husband walked over to me and asked, “You got any of those wipes you always carry in that thing?”  Continue reading “One critical protection for musicians and attendees at outdoor concerts”

‘I Can Only Imagine’ a must-see film for music lovers and musicians

I haven’t listened to a lot of contemporary Christian music, and until the song “I can Only Imagine” made its way into the mainstream, I wasn’t aware of the strength of that market. This weekend, I did something I rarely do—bought a digital copy of the film the song inspired. Even if you’re not Christian, you should see this film. Both music lovers and performers will learn a lot. Continue reading “‘I Can Only Imagine’ a must-see film for music lovers and musicians”

‘The Americans’ finale: One giant snoozefest

Warning: Spoilers ahead. Don’t read this if you haven’t seen the finale and don’t want to know what happens.

Last night, I actually arranged my evening around a TV show. I’ve followed The Americans fairly loyally since the first episode. Sometimes the series got bogged down in navel gazing, but overall it was a very entertaining narrative about Russia, Gorbachev, Reagan, the FBI, and the KGB. I tuned in at 10 p.m. to FX, expecting a strong finish. Instead, it was one giant snoozefest. Continue reading “‘The Americans’ finale: One giant snoozefest”

Summer poems trend with forced rhymes, but not all is lost

Perhaps only a psychic could see how Twitter selects trends each day, but at present, you’ll find #PoemToWelcomeSummer among top items. The topic shows 1, 546 Tweets as I write this, compared with another trend, #ILikeIt, with 673,000 current Tweets. Maybe some Twitter controller just had a beam in his eye for childhood summers.  The Twitterverse jumping on the summer poems chain gang favored forced rhymes and ditties. Poems included advice on sunscreen and laments about kids already bored now that school is out. All, however, is not lost.  Continue reading “Summer poems trend with forced rhymes, but not all is lost”

Memorial Day origins still debatable, but US honors war dead in unison

Societies have honored those who died in war dating to antiquity. In the US, we pay tribute on the last Monday in May. There is still an argument about who was the first to celebrate Memorial Day in the US, but there is unity in paying homage to those who’ve given their lives for country and flag. In the South when I was a young girl, I remember my grandmother buying artificial poppies from veterans collecting money for various causes on Memorial Day. Because the day was a holiday that demanded little in the way of celebration, everyone had their own take on observing it.  Continue reading “Memorial Day origins still debatable, but US honors war dead in unison”

After the royal wedding, notes on art, weddings and royals overlooked

I confess I didn’t watch the royal wedding. It wasn’t because I don’t like Prince Harry or his bride Meghan (Markle). It is because the concept of royalty offends the fervor in my DNA for liberty and equality. I did follow news, though, and some matters were overlooked. One of them is significant. It is because of royals that we now, in the US, consider white the official color for wedding dresses.  Continue reading “After the royal wedding, notes on art, weddings and royals overlooked”