Via Twitter, a brutally honest and laugh-worthy bipartisan political ad

Twitter is a cesspool as I’ve often said, but there are nuggets mixed in with the slime. One such nugget surfaced today via James Woods’ account. Woods got it from a funny political site where dogs are the top stars. That site appears to have gotten it from YouTube. If this sounds entertaining, it is. All manner of celebs Tweet, and there’s plenty for politics groupies to enjoy regardless of your preferences.

National Poetry Day launches in UK, but Americans get in on the fun

At first I thought it was a mistake because I’ve covered National Poetry Month stories for a long time. In the US, April is the month we celebrate poetry. As I read through posts on the Twitter cesspool, I realized the Brits celebrate the genre differently. Turns out today, October 4, is National Poetry Day in the United Kingdom. It also turns out I found some nice poems nestled in a lot of lame verses. 

The show must go on—unless you’re too sick

Every performer deals with it at some point. Things are bopping right along, going great, and then it hits. Someone gifts you with something you definitely don’t want—a virus. But you keep going because you have to. You may think to yourself it’s just a bug, and after a few days you’ll toss it off because you’re young and healthy. Then comes the point when you realize, yes, the show must go on, but sometimes, you just can’t. 

Most requested songs at gigs are often from the past

It doesn’t matter if you’re a performer or a music enthusiast, if you’ve taken in live music performances, you will always witness special requests. While it’s true most of my experience is in Americana or country venues, the requests cover all genres. “Time after Time” is a perfect example. 

Browning’s poem beat mine, but I agreed with the decision

It’s happened before and it will happen again. It’s happened to me personally and professionally. One simple poem can stop all motion and inspire even the most hardened anti-poetry type. I have many examples of this, based in part on the tours and readings I did to promote my book. My most recent experience happened on my deck out back on one of our football Saturdays. 

Poetry, fiction, nonfiction—Dorothy K. Fletcher successfully writes them all

I’ve known the writer Dorothy K. Fletcher for years, and we both have tire tracks down our backs from all the author events we’ve taken part in. There were two most memorable events for me—reading with Dorothy at the US Library of Congress in Washington, D. C., and another event that drew little attention but took up a permanent place in my heart. 

Like football? We have poems for that, you know

About five years ago, a professor at the US Naval Academy got into hot water. Why? He included a football poem for students to read in his English class. The poem was about football, it’s true, but like any fine poem, it’s about far more than that. Professor Bruce Fleming’s decision to teach “Kong Looks Back on his Tryout With the Bears” was a blessing to me even though I don’t know him. 

Sewell draws on Persian and US culture for jump into fiction

Some writers might rest on their laurels once they’d published four nonfiction books and hundreds of articles. Nahid Sewell, however, sought a means of sharing her ideas about tolerance. Born in Iran, Sewell had one foot in Persian culture and another in her experiences as a US college student. Like many other accomplished writers, Sewell came to realize fiction offered an opportunity to share her heritage and her newfound culture. 

Two creatives: Author and singer have stories to tell on Iran and more

I first came to know Nahid Sewell through her novel The Ruby Tear Catcher. I read the novel, and concurrently running through my mind were the Iranian expatriates I came to know well as friends in the 1980s. I wrote about her novel for The Writer Magazine. Years after I wrote that story, I saw video Nahid posted of her husband on Facebook where she and I had reconnected. I was blown away again. 

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