US gets a new Poet Laureate, but headlines mislead on ‘Native American’ aspect

Yesterday I think there were (at first) two people in the country who questioned a headline featured at many different media outlets. I was one of those two. The other person is a poet I’ve admired for quite some time. The headlines stated the new US Poet Laureate, Joy Harjo, is the nation’s first Native American to serve as US Poet Laureate. That statement is misleading and a fact check is in order.

Game of Thrones books leave you hanging, annoyed by TV scripts

Warning: Spoilers are included here, so proceed with that in mind. Once the TV series Game of Thrones ended, I decided to read the books. The novels took me two weeks, but I also read the chapters from the next book author George R.R. Martin had released on the Web. Blood, sex, and violence run as themes through all the books in the A Song of Ice and Fire series, even more so than in the TV series. Reading these books left me nearly blind from eyestrain and hoping for more because some of my favorite characters’ fates are left

Reeser’s ‘Strong Feather’ sonnet like a kick in the gut

Poet Jennifer Reeser has a new sonnet at Rattle, a print and online magazine known for publishing poets laureate and emerging voices. The sonnet, “Strong Feather Buries the White Woman’ is powerful, not just in terms of the history of our young country, the US, but in terms of my personal history. By coincidence as I read her sonnet for the first time, I was also engrossed in Reeser’s latest collection, Indigenous. In between reading those poems, I’ve been immersed in reading the A Song of Ice and Fire novels the HBO series Game of Thrones was based upon. Her

Football great has perfect take on GOT finale; author clears up rumors

My husband is still amused at my anger over the not so grand finale of Game of Thrones. After all these years of intrigue, war, and treachery, and after the incredible manipulation of fire-breathing dragons, how could the writers let us down in such an epic manner? I am now somewhat redeemed. Football great Aaron Rodgers, quarterback for the Green Bay Packers, had some things to say about the finale, and he perfectly summed things up. Yes, the finale was a giant bust, and not the kind of bust often bared or semi-bared in the iconic series.

Reeser poetry and GOT novels on my summer list–how about yours?

I’m not sure why I do this, because I read during the year too, but as summer approaches, I come up with a reading list. Maybe it’s a holdover from my school days. This year my list is ambitious. I’ve purchased Jennifer Reeser’s much-praised poetry collection Indigenous. I just purchased the 5-book bundle of George R. R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire novels. I deliberately didn’t read the novels until the Game of Thrones series on TV began to come to a close, so I’ll read them now and do some commentary on the books in comparison to

Attorney determined to clear pilot’s name—again—in Skyway Bridge disaster

Each May Floridians remember the 35 victims of the Skyway Bridge disaster in Tampa Bay. A freighter struck the bridge early in the morning on May 9, 1980. The freighter, Summit Venture, was flying the Liberian flag when a sudden storm made it impossible for radar to work. The freighter was trying to turn when it struck the bridge. John E. Lerro, the pilot, eventually was cleared as far as fault goes, but that didn’t stop people from judging him. Media understandably covered the story intensely. Lerro is dead now, but his attorney aims to clear his name for the

After Season 8, Episode 5, do we really know what happened to Cersei?

Warning: There are spoilers in this article. If you’re sensitive about that, don’t read it. Although TV is my least favorite form of entertainment, I have confessed publicly I get hooked on some series. Game of Thrones is one of them. I watched episode 5 of season 8 last night, eager to see Cersei get the fate she certainly deserved. Once the episode was over, I thought about a couple things, and one is a question. Did Cersei really die?

Singer writes firsthand about mystery of ‘Murder on Music Row’

Sammy Sadler’s story, one he is recounting firsthand in a new book, is one of those cautionary tales about life in the corporate music fast lane. Sadler, a breakout country artist in the late 1980s, had every reason to expect success in his industry. His voice commanded a wide range and his voice had something lacking in so many–character and uniqueness.  He had the looks, and his songs were charting nicely. Then came the night when he and his friend Kevin Hughes were leaving Sadler’s record label offices. A gunman emerged from the shadows, killing Hughes and seriously wounding Sadler.

Memoir confirms ‘Black Dahlia’ series on TNT a mishmash of fiction and truth

After viewing the limited series I Am the Night on TNT, I was thoroughly confused. It was hard to discern fact from fiction, and some of the events depicted in this “Inspired by a true story” production were simply too outrageous to believe. Having read the book the series was “inspired by”, I came to the conclusion the series was a mess. I’d read about the 1947 murder of Elizabeth Short, dubbed “The Black Dahlia” by media of the day. The murder remains unsolved officially, although author and private detective Steve Hodel believes he has the answers. The series included

Will indie authors and musicians catch the print and vinyl wave in 2019?

There appears to be a print and vinyl wave in progress if news reports are accurate. Books and vinyl records are holding their own, with print book sales increasing last year according to Quartz. This is good news to me, at least on the books end of things. I love books. I declare I won’t buy another one every time I dust the shelves of books in various rooms of my house. Then I go buy another one. Or two or more. As for vinyl records, I haven’t jumped on that option yet, but I might. The latest report I

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