Reeser poetry and GOT novels on my summer list–how about yours?

I’m not sure why I do this, because I read during the year too, but as summer approaches, I come up with a reading list. Maybe it’s a holdover from my school days. This year my list is ambitious. I’ve purchased Jennifer Reeser’s much-praised poetry collection Indigenous. I just purchased the 5-book bundle of George R. R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire novels. I deliberately didn’t read the novels until the Game of Thrones series on TV began to come to a close, so I’ll read them now and do some commentary on the books in comparison to

Attorney determined to clear pilot’s name—again—in Skyway Bridge disaster

Each May Floridians remember the 35 victims of the Skyway Bridge disaster in Tampa Bay. A freighter struck the bridge early in the morning on May 9, 1980. The freighter, Summit Venture, was flying the Liberian flag when a sudden storm made it impossible for radar to work. The freighter was trying to turn when it struck the bridge. John E. Lerro, the pilot, eventually was cleared as far as fault goes, but that didn’t stop people from judging him. Media understandably covered the story intensely. Lerro is dead now, but his attorney aims to clear his name for the

After Season 8, Episode 5, do we really know what happened to Cersei?

Warning: There are spoilers in this article. If you’re sensitive about that, don’t read it. Although TV is my least favorite form of entertainment, I have confessed publicly I get hooked on some series. Game of Thrones is one of them. I watched episode 5 of season 8 last night, eager to see Cersei get the fate she certainly deserved. Once the episode was over, I thought about a couple things, and one is a question. Did Cersei really die?

Singer writes firsthand about mystery of ‘Murder on Music Row’

Sammy Sadler’s story, one he is recounting firsthand in a new book, is one of those cautionary tales about life in the corporate music fast lane. Sadler, a breakout country artist in the late 1980s, had every reason to expect success in his industry. His voice commanded a wide range and his voice had something lacking in so many–character and uniqueness.  He had the looks, and his songs were charting nicely. Then came the night when he and his friend Kevin Hughes were leaving Sadler’s record label offices. A gunman emerged from the shadows, killing Hughes and seriously wounding Sadler.

Memoir confirms ‘Black Dahlia’ series on TNT a mishmash of fiction and truth

After viewing the limited series I Am the Night on TNT, I was thoroughly confused. It was hard to discern fact from fiction, and some of the events depicted in this “Inspired by a true story” production were simply too outrageous to believe. Having read the book the series was “inspired by”, I came to the conclusion the series was a mess. I’d read about the 1947 murder of Elizabeth Short, dubbed “The Black Dahlia” by media of the day. The murder remains unsolved officially, although author and private detective Steve Hodel believes he has the answers. The series included

Will indie authors and musicians catch the print and vinyl wave in 2019?

There appears to be a print and vinyl wave in progress if news reports are accurate. Books and vinyl records are holding their own, with print book sales increasing last year according to Quartz. This is good news to me, at least on the books end of things. I love books. I declare I won’t buy another one every time I dust the shelves of books in various rooms of my house. Then I go buy another one. Or two or more. As for vinyl records, I haven’t jumped on that option yet, but I might. The latest report I

Poetry, fiction, nonfiction—Dorothy K. Fletcher successfully writes them all

I’ve known the writer Dorothy K. Fletcher for years, and we both have tire tracks down our backs from all the author events we’ve taken part in. There were two most memorable events for me—reading with Dorothy at the US Library of Congress in Washington, D. C., and another event that drew little attention but took up a permanent place in my heart. 

Like football? We have poems for that, you know

About five years ago, a professor at the US Naval Academy got into hot water. Why? He included a football poem for students to read in his English class. The poem was about football, it’s true, but like any fine poem, it’s about far more than that. Professor Bruce Fleming’s decision to teach “Kong Looks Back on his Tryout With the Bears” was a blessing to me even though I don’t know him. 

Sewell draws on Persian and US culture for jump into fiction

Some writers might rest on their laurels once they’d published four nonfiction books and hundreds of articles. Nahid Sewell, however, sought a means of sharing her ideas about tolerance. Born in Iran, Sewell had one foot in Persian culture and another in her experiences as a US college student. Like many other accomplished writers, Sewell came to realize fiction offered an opportunity to share her heritage and her newfound culture. 

Two creatives: Author and singer have stories to tell on Iran and more

I first came to know Nahid Sewell through her novel The Ruby Tear Catcher. I read the novel, and concurrently running through my mind were the Iranian expatriates I came to know well as friends in the 1980s. I wrote about her novel for The Writer Magazine. Years after I wrote that story, I saw video Nahid posted of her husband on Facebook where she and I had reconnected. I was blown away again. 

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